All Ages

Ayse Zarakol- Before the West: The Rise and Fall of Eastern World Orders

Ayse Zarakol is Professor of International Relations at the University of Cambridge and a Politics Fellow at Emmanuel College. Her research is at the intersection of IR and historical sociology, focusing on East-West relations in the international system, history and future of world order(s), conceptualizations of modernity and sovereignty, rising and declining powers, and Turkish politics in a comparative perspective.

Cosponsored by the Fox International Fellowship

Race, Gender and Migration in the Global South

This workshop inaugurates a network of early career social scientists researching the racial and gendered dynamics of migration and bordering in the Global South. It emerges in response to the ongoing situation of anti-black and anti-immigrant violence in Tunisia, precipitated by statements President Saied made calling for the deportation of sub-Saharan African migrants and stoking racial violence against them. As scholars of the region point out, racialized discourses regarding sub-Saharan migration are not new to Tunisia nor new to North Africa at large.

Wonders and Rarities: The Marvelous Book That Traveled the World and Mapped the Cosmos

Wonders and Rarities: The Marvelous Book That Traveled the World and Mapped the Cosmos
A Yale Seminar in Religious Studies Book Talk
with Travis Zadeh, Associate Professor, Religious Studies
In conversation with Manan Ahmed, Associate Professor, Columbia University, and Elly Truitt Associate Professor, University of Pennsylvania,
moderated by Kathryn Lofton, FAS Dean of Humanities, Yale University.

Friday, April 21, 2023
WLH 309, 100 Wall Street
3:30 – 5:00
*Refreshments served at 3:00

PRFDHR Seminar: Revealing the Space for a Peace Agreement between Parties in Conflict, Professor Elisa Cavatorta

In this presentation, Professor Elisa Cavatorta develops a novel conjoint analysis to study the preferences and priorities of ordinary citizens regarding the components of potential peace agreements between people in conflict. Her application is the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. This approach elicits preferences over competing issues, reveals acceptable and unacceptable trade-offs and visualizes the Zone Of Possible Agreement (ZOPA): the set of mutually acceptable peace deals, and within that set identifies cooperative bargaining solutions.

PRFDHR Colloquium: Living in Impermanence, Rizvi Hassan

Life in a refugee camp is often seen as an impermanent thing, where in reality it actually becomes a big part of a refugee’s life. Inclusive and healthy environment in a camp is thus very important for the well-being of both the displaced and host communities. From 2018 to 2022, working with the Rohingya refugees as well as the surrounding Bangladeshi hosting communities in Ukhiya-Teknaf area, has never been about one particular space, but about collaborating together in a crisis situation to overcome the unexpected challenges over time.

PRFDHR Seminar: Genocide in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Its Aftermath: Bosnian Muslims’ Perceptions, Interpretations, and Explanations, Professor Jasmina Besirevic Regan

The presentation will provide a brief overview of the history of former Yugoslavia and focus on its violent break-up, especially on the case of Bosnia and Herzegovina. It will discuss the refugee experience and importance of family relationships, ethnic and religious identities, as well as the issues around returning home and rebuilding their community in Banja Luka.

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