News

Daniel Gerlach, editor-in-chief of the German Middle East magazine Zenith
The article below, written by Kelly Wei, appeared in the November 7, 2018, issue of the Yale Daily News. Dozens gathered in Luce Hall on Tuesday to hear from Daniel Gerlach...
Photo by Carly Wanna
The article below was written by Carly Wanna for the Yale Daily News (Nov. 5, 2018): Many of Yale’s language programs offer opportunities for students to practice their...
A photograph of archaeologist Frank Brown and his crew in the Temple of the Gadde at Dura-Europos, Syria, during the 1934–1935 joint excavation of the ancient city by Yale and the University- Académie des Inscriptions. (Yale University Art Gallery, Dura-Europos Collection)
Last spring, Kishwar Rizvi, professor of the history of art, led a group of eight graduate students to the United Arab Emirates (UAE) as part of her seminar “Museum and...
Marcia C. Inhorn, Yale University
On September 28, the MacMillan Center and the Department of Anthropology hosted a ground-breaking conference on “Waithood: Gender, Education, and Global Delays in Marriage.”...
Doris Gray
Doris Gray, director of the Hillary Clinton Center for Women’s Empowerment at Al Akhawayn University in Ifrane, Morocco, professor, and author, gave a talk on Women and...
John Darnell, professor of Egyptology at Yale, along with a team of researchers, uncovered a “lost oasis” in the eastern Egyptian desert. One image dates back to about 3,300 B.C.E. and includes large depictions of animals, including an addax, or antelope. “The large addax in particular deserves to be added to the artistic achievements of early Egypt,” says Darnell.
A team of archaeologists — led by Yale Egyptologist John Darnell — has uncovered a “lost oasis” of archaeological activity in the eastern Egyptian desert of Elkab. The...
The text, written in Sumerian, outlines the monthly rations that female weavers employed by the state received from the local administration in Irisagrig, where such rations tended to be unusually generous. Puzur-Iškur is known from other Irisagrig texts as having been an “overseer of the weavers.” The month name Nig-Enlila was only used in Irisagrig and some nearby settlements, which confirms that the text has to come from this area.
When Eckart Frahm, professor of Assyriology and a core faculty member of the Council on Middle East Studies at the MacMillan Center, received a call from Homeland Security...