CMES Colloquium Spring 2022

Thursday, January 27, 2022 - 12:00pm

Speaker/Performer: Janine di Giovanni, Yale University

Janine di Giovanni, a Senior Fellow at the Yale Jackson Institute for Global Affairs, has reported some of the world’ most violent conflicts and wars for three decades, investigating and documenting human rights abuse in the Middle East, Africa and the Balkans. She is currently directing a project sponsored by the UN Democracy Fund that promotes transitional justice in Yemen, Iraq, and Syria called Enabling Witnesses, working with Yale Jackson MA students. In 2019, she won a Guggenheim Fellowship for her life time research in the Middle East, and in 2020, she received the American Academy of Arts and Letters highest prize for non-fiction, the Blake Dodd, for her body of work spanning 30 years. She is a multi-award winning writer and author, currently Global Affairs columnist for Foreign Policy Magazine and The National, in Abu Dhabi, as well as a contributor to the Washington Post, the New York Times and many other publications. From 2017 to 2018, Di Giovanni was the Edward R. Murrow Press Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) and a Professor of Practice in Human Rights at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Administration. She is also the author of the award-winning book, The Morning They Came For Us: Dispatches from Syria.

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Thursday, February 3, 2022 - 12:00pm

Speaker/Performer: Nizar Messari, Yale University/Akhawayn University

Nizar Messari is an Associate Professor at Al Akawayn University in Ifrane, Morocco, and a visiting professor at Yale’s MacMillan Center Council on Middle East Studies. His main area of expertise is International Relations Theory, which applications and alternative perspectives he explores in North Africa. His latest publications include “The EU and North Africa, or the Actorness of the Possible” in EU Global Actorness in a World of Contested Leadership – Policies, Instruments and Perceptions, (London: Palgrave Macmillan, Forthcoming), a contribution to the Forum: Did “America First” Construct America Irrelevant? International Studies Perspectives, 2021, and “Migration” in International Relations from the Global South: Worlds of Difference, (London: Routledge, 2020).

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Thursday, February 10, 2022 - 12:00pm

Speaker/Performer: Allison Mickel, Lehigh University

Allison Mickel is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology in the Department of Sociology & Anthropology, and Assistant Director of Global Studies, at Lehigh University. Her research focuses on how local communities have impacted and been affected by the long history of archaeological work in the Middle East. She has excavated in Jordan, Turkey, Kenya, and the United States. Her first book, Archaeologists as Authors and the Stories of Sites: Defending the Use of Fiction in Archaeological Writing, focused on the politics of representation and public engagement in publications about archaeology. Her new book, Why Those Who Shovel are Silent: A History of Local Archaeological Labor and Knowledge, is out now and examines the ways in which the economics of labor management and the epistemology of archaeology are intertwined. Mickel was recently awarded a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities to undertake an ethnographic project centering on two new private companies in Jordan advocating for the recognition of local expertise and fair labor conditions on archaeological excavations.

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Thursday, February 17, 2022 - 12:00pm

Speaker/Performer: Dalton Einhorn, Yale School of Management ‘97

Dalton Einhorn is a graduate of Yale’s School of Management and has spent the past twenty-four years as an enthusiastic student mentor. He has an unusual connection to this lecture, which will be the first-ever unveiling of the origin story of Kahlil Gibran’s “The Prophet” told by the author himself from an archive of never-published materials that was found at the University of North Carolina. More than a century after the book’s creation, Gibran tells the speaks to us as we embark on the next one hundred years of the life of the best-selling book of the Twentieth Century! Dalton’s mother, Virginia Hilu, was the first and only person ever to be authorized to produce a book from the UNC archive. After she produced that book, she worked on Stanley Milgram’s “Obedience to Authority” and her notes and his original draft chapters can be found at Stirling Library. Virginia died young, and Dalton spent seven years getting permissions from estate holders to continue his work. What he found was the untouched origin story of “The Prophet.” This talk will share the loving story of its creation and has a number of charming wrinkles. And it will also be an important insight into one of the most important books of the past one hundred years, conceived first in the mind of a sixteen year old student in Beirut, Lebanon.

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Thursday, February 24, 2022 - 12:00pm

Speaker/Performer: Lizzy Berk, Yale University

Lizzy Berk is currently serving as a CMES postgraduate associate and recently received her PhD in anthropology from Yale University. She also pursued a certificate in gender and sexuality studies during her doctoral work, and holds an MA from Washington University in St. Louis. Lizzy’s work focuses on issues related to gender/sexuality, time, and subjectivity in chronic illness.

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Thursday, March 31, 2022 - 12:00pm

Speaker/Performer: Lain Macgillivray, Yale University/University of Melbourne

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Thursday, April 7, 2022 - 12:00pm

Speaker/Performer: Leslie Gross Wyrtzen, Yale University

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Thursday, April 14, 2022 - 12:00pm

Speaker/Performer: Gustavo Barbosa, Universidade Federal Fluminense

Gustavo Barbosa is an Associate Researcher at the Center of Middle Eastern Studies at Universidade Federal Fluminense, in Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He holds a PhD in Anthropology from the London School of Economics (LSE) and MScs, also in Anthropology, from the LSE and Museu Nacional/Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. He has published several articles in English and Portuguese and his book The Best of Hard Times – Palestinian Refugee Masculinities in Lebanon is being published by Syracuse in February/2022. His academic interests lie in gender, masculinity, refugees, Palestinians, hope, and new reproductive technologies. His homepage is gustavo-barbosa.com.

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Thursday, April 28, 2022 - 12:00pm

Speaker/Performer: Aaron Rock Singer, University of Wisconsin

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